Photo Location Archive: Lower Radley

Spring Hammock-spider

Neriene montana(12 August 2013)

Permanent link to this article: http://www.radleyvillage.org.uk/nature-post/spider/

Splayed Deer Fly

Chrysops caecutiens, a horsefly(22 July 2013)

Permanent link to this article: http://www.radleyvillage.org.uk/nature-post/horse-fly-3/

Fly Bug

Fly Bug (Reduvius personatus)(19 July 2013)

Permanent link to this article: http://www.radleyvillage.org.uk/nature-post/fly-bug/

Salticus cingulatus, a jumping/zebra spider

Salticus cingulatus(07 June 2013)

Permanent link to this article: http://www.radleyvillage.org.uk/nature-post/jumping-spider/

Crossocerus megacephalus

Crossocerus megacephalus – a digger wasp(with prey, in vicinity of nest, 02 August 2012)

Permanent link to this article: http://www.radleyvillage.org.uk/nature-post/digger-wasp-3/

Anopheles Mosquito

    Anopheles maculipennis spp. which is a species complex comprising Anopheles atroparvus and Anopheles messeae. The former is more likely to come into houses, which is where this one was found. (Identification by Tony Irwin, www.diptera.info) Any mosquito is unwelcome, and this one more than most. In warmer climates, it is a vector for …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.radleyvillage.org.uk/nature-post/mosquito-2/

Red-sided Sector Spider – female

  Zygiella atrica – female(On outside of building, though it is more commonly found away from houses, 24 March 2011)

Permanent link to this article: http://www.radleyvillage.org.uk/nature-post/orb-weaver-female/

Yellow Legged Mining Bee

Andrena flavipes – a mining bee(23 March 2011)

Permanent link to this article: http://www.radleyvillage.org.uk/nature-post/mining-bee/

Lace Weaver Spider – female

Amaurobius similis – female(indoors, 17 February 2011)

Permanent link to this article: http://www.radleyvillage.org.uk/nature-post/cribellate-spider-female/

Small House Spider

Tegenaria domestica – male(19 August 2010) This spider, found indoors, was identified mainly on the basis of its size. At 7mm, it is distinctly smaller than a male T. gigantea=duellica. The spiders forelegs are in contact with another spider under the skirting board, and the spider was determined to maintain that contact, …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.radleyvillage.org.uk/nature-post/small-house-spider/

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